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What will the world look like at 1.5 degrees Celsius?

A displaced girl carries a bottle of water she filled from nearby stranded flood-waters, as her family takes refuge in a camp, in Sehwan, Pakistan, September 30, 2022. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomr

A displaced girl carries a bottle of water she filled from nearby stranded flood-waters, as her family takes refuge in a camp, in Sehwan, Pakistan, September 30, 2022. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomr

What’s the context?

As the planet heats, risks from crop failures to species extinctions and increasingly extreme weather are growing. We take a look at what might be in store around the globe

Global temperatures have risen more than 1.2 degrees Celsius (2.2 Fahrenheit) since preindustrial times and are now swiftly approaching a 1.5C of warming mark that scientists fear could herald a transition to far costlier and deadlier climate change impacts.

With fossil fuel use still rising globally, despite pledges to slash emissions, 1.5C of warming - the more ambitious limit set in the 2015 Paris Agreement - could be passed within a decade, top climate scientists say.

What would that look like for people and communities around the world? Our ‘World at 1.5C’ series takes a look, from Indonesia to Sweden, Brazil to the U.S. East Coast.

U.S: U.S. East coast faces 'competing catastrophes' as fire risk grows

India: As heat wilts crops, India's women forfeit their gold to survive

Sweden: Sea level rise now menaces even a Viking bastion of uplifted land

Indonesia: Warming seas bring Indonesia's fishermen deadly storms, empty nets

Egypt: Egypt's farmers fear rising social tensions over scarce water

Brazil: As planet heats, Brazil's anteaters face rising extinction risk


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Tags

Extreme weather
Adaptation
Fossil fuels
Climate policy
Agriculture and farming
Climate and health
Loss and damage

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